National Thank a Mailman Day

National Thank a Mailman Day

 

February 4th, 2015 is National Thank a Mailman Day!

Did you know?

  • Before the postal service, people had to rely on each other to carry messages from place to place.
  • Benjamin Franklin served as America’s first Postmaster General in 1775.
  • Did you know that before postage stamps were “invented” back in 1847, folks were required to pre-pay for the mail before it was sent or the poor soul who received the letter got stuck with the tab?
  • On April 3, 1860, the famous Pony Express officially took off.
  • Read about the Barefoot Mailman who traveled the nearly 70 miles on hard sand without shoes back in the late 1800s.
  • In 1863, free city delivery started and in 1896, free rural delivery began.
  • In 1963, the Zip Code began.
  • The rapid growth of technology, specifically email and texting, may soon impact the way the U.S. Postal Service delivers.

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Source: www.examiner.com

 

Did you know?
1. Maybe your dog won’t bite you. But in 2009, 2,863 of us were bitten, an average of nine bites per delivery day. That’s why I wince when your Doberman comes flying out the door.

2. Remember this on Valentine’s Day: It takes our machines longer to read addresses on red envelopes (especially if they’re written in colored ink).

3. Why stand in line? At usps.com, you can buy stamps, place a hold on your mail, change your address, and apply for passports. We even offer free package pickup and free flat-rate envelopes and boxes, all delivered right to your doorstep.

4. Media Mail is a bargain, but most of you don’t know to ask for it. Sending ten pounds of books from New York City to San Francisco through Media Mail costs $5.89, compared with $16.77 for Parcel Post. Besides books, use it to send manuscripts, DVDs, and CDs; just don’t include anything else in the package.

5. We don’t get a penny of your tax dollars. Really.

6. UPS and FedEx charge you $10 or more for messing up an address. Us? Not a cent.

7. Paychecks, personal cards, letters—anything that looks like good news—I put those on top. Utility and credit card bills? They go under everything else.

 

Source: www.rd.com